How to Look Up the Location of a California State Prison Inmate

Posted on Tuesday, January 29th, 2019 at 7:52 am    

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You can find just about any type of information online these days, and even public records are available for viewing if you’ve got an electronic device and an internet connection. It’s possible to find out where a California state prison inmate is held with just a few clicks and a promise to not use the details for an unlawful purpose. You start by conducting a search via the Inmate Locator website run by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR).

However, the location may not be up-to-date if the individual was recently incarcerated or is being transferred between institutions. Because of the complicated intake process in California, which ultimately determines location, the internet won’t help you in this situation. Our Los Angeles criminal defense attorneys at Spolin Law P.C. can explain the process of locating an inmate in more detail, so contact our office at (310) 424-5816 to schedule a free consultation.

Reception into the California State Prison Inmate System

The first step after an inmate is ordered for incarceration is reception, which involves multiple stages.

Inmate Placement

During this phase, the state’s Unit Classification Committee (UCC) reviews details of the inmate’s case history and other relevant factors, such as:

  • Age
  • Type of crime
  • Whether the offense involved violence
  • Prior criminal history
  • Gang involvement

An inmate accumulates points for every factor that applies to them, and others for the circumstances surrounding the crime. The UCC tallies the points to come up with a placement score.

How Placement Scores Affect the Location of a California State Prison Inmate

The goal of assigning points is to provide an Inmate Placement Security Level, which will determine the type of facility and accommodation arrangements that are necessary under the circumstances.

A Level I security level means an inmate will be placed in a facility that features low security and a mostly open, dormitory-style living arrangement. Individuals with scores ranging from 0-18 may qualify for this security level. When an inmate scores between 19-35 points, Level II applies. The institution is also mostly open, but there is armed coverage in certain areas. Level III describes a facility with a highly secure perimeter, protected by armed guards. Inmate cells are adjacent to exterior walls. The scoring range for this level is 36-59. Top security arrangements fall under Level IV, which applies to inmates that score at 60 points and above. The institution’s perimeter is extremely secure, and there are armed guards at the interior and exterior. Because it’s the highest security level, there is an interior gap between inmate cells and the exterior.

From start to finish, the reception process can take up to 120 days. Once completed, the inmate is transferred to an appropriate institution that can provide accommodations and suitable programs. The information is entered into the Inmate Locator website, which you can search to find their location.

Determining Location After Initial Placement

Every year, the UCC also conducts a review on every California State Prison inmate to determine whether there’s any reason to adjust the placement score. It’s possible to reduce the score for good behavior and avoiding any trouble while incarcerated. Of course, an inmate can also increase their score through misconduct and disciplinary actions.

Depending on how officials rule on placement scores, the location of an inmate may change. An inmate may be transferred within the prison system to the appropriate security Levels I through IV.

Contact a Los Angeles Criminal Defense Lawyer to Learn More

Regardless of your reasons for looking up a California state prison inmate, it’s important to understand the factors that determine where they end up, and where they could be going. If you’d like more information on inmate location and how the state prison system works, call Spolin Law P.C. at (310) 424-5816, or reach out via our online form to schedule a free, initial evaluation of your case.